Category Archives: images

Actors Revisit Their Famous Roles in Normal Attire

TwistedSifter

 

Empire Magazine is the largest selling film magazine in Britain and has been published monthly since 1989. To celebrate their 20th anniversary, they published a special edition of their magazine that was guest-edited by Steven Spielberg.

In a special section entitled The Birthday Portfolio, Empire had an exclusive star-studded photoshoot that paid tribute to some of the most iconic moments in movies in the last 20 years (1989 – 2009). The 20th anniversary issue featured over 27 Hollywood stars reliving some of their famous performances in their normal everyday attire.

Below is a snippet from this amazing photo series via atticus_finch on LiveJournal. To order the Empire 20th Anniversary Edition online go to: http://www.subscription.co.uk/home/prods.asp?m=807

 

 

1. Arnold Schwarzenegger – The Terminator

 

 

 

2. Anthony Hopkins & Jodie Foster – The Silence of the…

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ISS Cupola: The Window to the World

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TwistedSifter

 

The Cupola is an ESA-built observatory module of the International Space Station (ISS). Its seven windows are used to conduct experiments, dockings and observations of Earth. It was launched aboard Space Shuttle mission STS-130 on 8 February 2010 and attached to the Tranquility (Node 3) module. The Cupola’s 80 cm (31 in) window is the largest ever used in space.

Its name derives from the Italian word cupola, which means “dome”. It is extremely important to the ISS astronauts, as previously they have been confined to looking out of small portholes or at best the 20-inch (50 cm) window in the US Destiny laboratory.

Specifications
Overall height: 1.5-metre (4.9 ft)
Maximum diameter: 2.95-metre (9.68 ft)
Launch mass: 1,805-kilogram (3,979 lb)
On Orbit mass: 1,880-kilogram (4,145 lb)
Dome: Forged Al 2219-T851
Skirt: Al 2219-T851
Windows: Fused silica and borosilicate glass
MDPS shutters: DuPont Kevlar/3M Nextel sheets
Electrical power:…

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How the French Hid the Louvre’s Masterpieces During WWII:

TwistedSifter

unveiling the mona lisa world war 2 louvre

 

Beginning in 1938, the threat of war prompted a large-scale evacuation of France’s public art collections. The storage sites chosen for works of art were châteaux, tranquil locations in the heart of the French countryside, far from strategic targets, and thus escaping the imminent danger of bombing.

On August 28, 1939, the Mona Lisa left the Louvre and on September 3, as war had been declared, a decision was taken to ensure that all of the most precious works would leave the premises by the end of the day.

During the war, Leonardo da Vinci’s smiling maiden would move another five times before being brought back safe and sound. It was an unprecedented journey for the world’s most famous painting.

 

Moving the Winged Victory of Samothrace

moving the Ascent of the Winged Victory of Samothrace world war II the louvre

 

On the Road

 
Stowed away in…

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