Tag Archives: December

As you might have guessed, I am a wise, intelligent individual, and, because of these two facts, I am asked many questions about a variety of subjects on a daily basis. Today, of all days, I feel like answering one: how does one become popular in high school?

Gather ’round, dear readers, for I am about to tell you the secret to high school popularity: CHAIN-MAIL.

CHAIN. MAIL.

CHAIN-MAILCHAIN-MAIL. CHAIN-MAIL. CHAIN-MAIL. CHAIN-MAIL. CHAIN-MAIL. CHAIN-MAIL. CHAIN-MAIL. CHAIN-MAIL. CHAIN-MAIL. CHAIN-MAIL. CHAIN-MAIL. CHAIN-MAIL. CHAIN-MAIL. CHAIN-MAIL. CHAIN-MAIL. CHAIN-MAIL

Jackson Williams.

David Foster Wallace & the Nature of Fact

dfw2

Longreads

Josh Roiland | Literary Journalism Studies | Fall 2013 | 23 minutes (5,690 words)

Josh Roiland is in his second year as a visiting assistant professor in the Department of American Studies and the John W. Gallivan Program in Journalism, Ethics and Democracy at the University of Notre Dame. He researches and teaches classes on the cultural, political, and literary significance of American journalism. This piece originally appeared in the Fall 2013 issue of Literary Journalism Studies. Our thanks to Roiland for allowing us to reprint it here, and for adding this introduction:

David Foster Wallace saw clear lines between journalists and novelists who write nonfiction, and he wrestled throughout his career with whether a different set of rules applied to the latter category. In the years after his death, he has faced charges of embellishment and exaggeration by his close friend Jonathan Franzen and repeated by his biographer D.T. Max. Their…

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