Tag Archives: England

“Parklife” (blur)

Confidence is a preference for the habitual voyeur
Of what is known as
(Parklife)
And morning soup can be avoided
If you take a route straight through what is known as
(Parklife)

John’s got brewers droop he gets intimidated
By the dirty pigeons, they love a bit of him
(Parklife)
Who’s that gut lord marching?
You should cut down on your porklife mate, get some exercise

All the people
So many people
They all go hand in hand
Hand in hand through their parklife
Know what I mean?

I get up when I want except on Wednesdays
When I get rudely awakened by the dustmen
(Parklife)
I put my trousers on, have a cup of tea
And I think about leaving the house
(Parklife)

I feed the pigeons I sometimes feed the sparrows too
It gives me a sense of enormous well-being
(Parklife)
And then I’m happy for the rest of the day safe in the knowledge
There will always be a bit of my heart devoted to it

All the people
So many people
And they all go hand in hand
Hand in hand through their parklife

Parklife
(Parklife)
Parklife
(Parklife)

It’s got nothing to do with
Vorsprung durch Technik you know
(Parklife)
And it’s not about you joggers
Who go round and round and round
(Parklife)

All the people
So many people
And they all go hand in hand
Hand in hand through their parklife

All the people
So many people
And they all go hand in hand
Hand in hand through their parklife

(JW)

The Massacre At Paris: Kit Marlowe, the Rose Playhouse, and Me

Mathew Lyons

massacreAs some friends may know, I spent last week acting in the final six performances of The Dolphin’s Back production of Christopher Marlowe’s The Massacre at Paris at the Rose Playhouse on London’s South Bank. The offer to do so came out of the blue, so much so that – as much out of surprise as anything – I initially said no.

I had seen the director James Wallace’s previous, superb revival of John Lyly’s The Woman in the Moon – also at the Rose – and we had got chatting after the show about early-modern drama and such. He said that he was looking for someone to play the part of Peter Ramus (actually Pierre de la Ramée), the humanist scholar; his original choice was unavailable for health reasons and James himself was playing the part until someone else came along. For reasons that are still obscure to me…

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The Maunsell Sea Forts of WWII

TwistedSifter

WWII Sea Forts - Red Sands
Photograph by Neil Brown on Flickr

At the outbreak of World War II, the Port of London was the busiest port in the world. The German Navy recognized the Thames as an important shipping route and sought to disrupt its usage through the use of a new secret weapon — the magnetic influence mine. Essentially these mines were detonated by the presence of a large metallic object, like that of a steel-hulled ship. This meant that the mines could detonate with ships in close proximity, not having to actually make physical contact to be effective.

Hundreds of ships were sunk by these innovative mines and the Allies needed a solution, fast. Knowing the mines were laid by aircraft, Guy Maunsell (1884-1961), a British civil engineer, produced plans for offshore defences. After some modifications his plans were approved and the Maunsell Sea Forts and Army Towers were born. [Source: Project Redsand

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Burying Richard III once and for all?

Stuart Orme

20140313-182015.jpg

As someone who is interested by late Medieval history, particularly the Wars of the Roses, it won’t surprise you to learn that I’ve been following with some interest the debate, and resulting courtroom wrangling, over which city should provide the final resting place of Richard III. Ever since the University of Leicester announced the positive identification of the bones found under a Leicester car park, much ink has been spilt over the rights and wrongs of where the last Plantagenet King should be buried. The considerations of a substantial boost to tourism, the rights of (admittedly very, very distant) relatives, the mishandling of the affair by some of the parties concerned and the emotional response of many of Richard’s adherents has led to an increasingly heated debate.

As I write this, the courts are deciding whether to recommend a full consultation on the decision to bury Richard in Leicester. I…

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An Octopus & the Essex Maidens: A Visit to Ilford In the County of Essex

Some writers HATE being reblogged, dear readers, but I just had to reblog this one. It’s EXCELLENT writing + listen to the podcast. Make haste, my dear readers.J.W.

Ventures & Adventures in Topography

One summer’s morning back in 1971, my Dad, my brother Stavros and I set out by taxi from our home in Burnt Oak to spend a week by the sea in Essex. At 13 I knew far less about the layout of my region than I do now; that my desire to understand the layout of London was burgeoning was evident from my interest in the route we took—down the A5 Edgware Road to Paddington and then left along Euston Road towards the City. I still recall the red Post-office vans lined up in ranks outside Mount Pleasant as we passed by in the early morning light. Liverpool Street station was dark and smoke-blackened still, despite the disappearance of the steam trains some years before. The green and yellow electric locos, so different to the familiar underground trains, their pantographs down, brought to mind a train journey to Greece made…

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