Tag Archives: Entertainment

How the Music Industry Capitalized on Foodie Culture — and Why the Culinary World Is Turning the Tables

Illustration by Brett Nuckles for Flavorwire.

Flavorwire

Illustration by Brett Nuckles for Flavorwire. Illustration by Brett Nuckles for Flavorwire.

A few months ago, in a foreign city I’d never visited before, I found myself fondling raw steak in a pitch-black room. Despite the disconcerting situation, all I could focus on was the conversation taking place several tables away: an argument between two men over a friendly bet. It sounded like they were wearing lapel mics. When one or more of the five senses is impaired, our remaining abilities overcompensate — a fact that sits at the heart of Montreal restaurant O.Noir’s light-free concept — but I hadn’t imagined my hearing would be the sense to take over when I sat down to dinner.

With all due respect to my dining companion — my oldest friend — I can’t remember a word he said that night. I do, however, remember the smug tone taken by one of the men arguing at the table to…

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Sparkling Music for a Dishwater World: The Shins & the Limitations of the Indie Rock Narrative

Tropics of Meta

In March, Columbia Records launched one of its major albums of 2012, the Shins’s Port of Morrow. In the five years that had elapsed since the last full-length Shins release, the band, which became one of rock’s standard bearers with three terrific albums for Sub Pop Records between 2001 and 2007, underwent significant changes. Although two original Shins appear briefly on Port of Morrow, band founder, songwriter, and leader James Mercer remains the only permanent member. In addition to the new line-up, Port of Morrow is the first Shins album distributed by a major label. Mercer and the revamped band have generated extraordinary interest in the record, participating in a Columbia engineered program of multimedia promotion that has included live performance broadcasts (including a full hour on The Late Show with David Letterman), a nationwide tour, appearances at major festivals in the United States and Europe, consumer…

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“Take Me to the River” (Talking Heads)

Don’t know why I love her like I do
All the changes you put me through
Take my money, my cigarettes
I haven’t seen the worst of it yet

I wanna know can you’ll tell me
I love to stay

Take me to the river, drop me in the water
Take me to the river, drop me in the water, water

Don’t know why you treat me so bad
Think of all the things we could have had
Love is an ocean, I can’t forget
My sweet sixteen I would never regret

I wanna know that you’ll tell me
I love to stay

Take me to the river, drop me in the water
Take me to the river, push me in the water

Hold me, squeeze me, love me, tease me
Till I can’t, till I can’t, I can’t take no more of it

Take me to the river, drop me in the water
Take me to the river, push me in the water

J.W.

The Best Midnight Movie Candidates of the 21st Century

spring breakers

Flavorwire

We love a good underdog story. “Small-time theater owners, who could rent inexpensive pictures without having to pay distributors a percentage of the receipts, were able to flourish, which led to the growth of art houses, revival houses, and third-run grind houses. And this, in turn, made the midnight movie phenomenon possible,” explains critic Jonathan Rosenbaum in Midnight Movies. Today, repertory movie houses like Los Angeles’ New Beverly Cinema and New York City’s Film Forum are keeping the spirit of the midnight movies alive with screenings of cult classics and weird indies. We recently brought you a list of the best midnight movies of all time. Since then, we’ve been wondering what films will be the cult objects of tomorrow? What movies from this century will endure as midnight classics? And so we present the best midnight movie candidates of the 21st century. Some of these movies are already…

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50 Essential Mystery Novels That Everyone Should Read

Typewriter

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Editor’s note: This post was originally published in January 2014. We’ve selected it as one of the posts we’re republishing for our 10th anniversary celebrations in May 2017.

In these weeks of midwinter, there’s nothing more satisfying than curling up by the fire with a good novel — and in particular a good mystery novel, because they somehow seem to keep you the warmest. Plus, what with a new season of Sherlock starting this week, your appetite for more murders, clues, and suspicious persons might just be piqued. After the jump, check out 50 essential mystery novels (and spy novels, and crime novels — the genre tends to get a little blurry) that will bring color to your cheeks and set your brain ticking. Usual rules apply: one book by any given author, and all choices subjective — add your own favorites in the comments and keep the list of…

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“Once In A Lifetime” (Talking Heads)

one of my top 5 favorite bands…

And you may find yourself living in a shotgun shack
And you may find yourself in another part of the world
And you may find yourself behind the wheel of a large automobile
And you may find yourself in a beautiful house, with a beautiful
wife
And you may ask yourself-Well…How did I get here?

Letting the days go by/let the water hold me down
Letting the days go by/water flowing underground
Into the blue again/after the money’s gone
Once in a lifetime/water flowing underground.

And you may ask yourself
How do I work this?
And you may ask yourself
Where is that large automobile?
And you may tell yourself
This is not my beautiful house!
And you may tell yourself
This is not my beautiful wife!
Letting the days go by/let the water hold me down
Letting the days go by/water flowing underground
Into the blue again/after the money’s gone
Once in a lifetime/water flowing underground.

Same as it ever was…Same as it ever was…Same as it ever was…
Same as it ever was…Same as it ever was…Same as it ever was…
Same as it ever was…Same as it ever was…

Water dissolving…and water removing
There is water at the bottom of the ocean
Carry the water at the bottom of the ocean
Remove the water at the bottom of the ocean!

Letting the days go by/let the water hold me down
Letting the days go by/water flowing underground
Into the blue again/in the silent water
Under the rocks and stones/there is water underground.

Letting the days go by/let the water hold me down
Letting the days go by/water flowing underground
Into the blue again/after the money’s gone
Once in a lifetime/water flowing underground.

And you may ask yourself
What is that beautiful house?
And you may ask yourself
Where does that highway go?
And you may ask yourself
Am I right?…Am I wrong?
And you may tell yourself
MY GOD!…WHAT HAVE I DONE?

Letting the days go by/let the water hold me down
Letting the days go by/water flowing underground
Into the blue again/in the silent water
Under the rocks and stones/there is water underground.

Letting the days go by/let the water hold me down
Letting the days go by/water flowing underground
Into the blue again/after the money’s gone
Once in a lifetime/water flowing underground.

Same as it ever was…Same as it ever was…Same as it ever was…
Same as it ever was…Same as it ever was…Same as it ever was…
Same as it ever was…Same as it ever was…

J.W.

The Power of Mournful Music in Tragic Times, From Jason Molina on 9/11 to Nina Simone on MLK

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On 9/11, the late, great Jason Molina was supposed to be recording with Will Oldham and Alasdair Roberts at Oldham’s brother Paul’s Kentucky farmhouse. Instead, they spent all day watching the news, distraught, terrified, and lost. By night they put to tape some reckoning with what they had just seen. This song, posted online last week by Molina’s label Secretly Canadian with a brief introduction from Roberts, is titled simply: “September 11, 2001.” It is in many ways absolutely remarkable. Though oblique, Molina’s images cannot belong to any other moment. He describes the “pre-world dark,” conjures ash on “a weeping wind,” asks, repeatedly, about the “blue gospel flames.” At various points he exhorts the other players to “cast your offering,” Roberts scraping a bow against dulcimer strings, Oldham stumbling over piano chords. Even now it is frequently a painful listen.

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