Tag Archives: Life

Sunday Post: Sentimental Value

baseballgrass

I love you, baseball. I’m glad you’re back.J.W.

Ohm Sweet Ohm

Sentimental Value: The personal value of an object, place or pet derived from the personal memories associated with it.
Jake’s Sunday Post

This baseball has 216 single red stitches just like every other baseball made by Rawlings, but it has a very special sentimental value for me. It was a gift to me from a prisoner who plays on the San Quentin Giants baseball team in California’s notorious San Quentin State Prison.

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“Road to Nowhere” (Talking Heads)

Well, we know where we’re goin’
but we don’t know where we’ve been.
And we know what we’re knowing’
but we can’t say what we’ve seen.
And we’re not little children
and we know what we want.
And the future is certain
give us time to work it out.
We’re on a road to nowhere
come on inside.
Takin’ that ride to nowhere
we’ll take that ride.
I’m feelin’ okay this mornin’
and you know.
We’re on the road to paradise
here we go
here we go.
We’re on a road to nowhere
come on inside.
Takin’ that ride to nowhere
we’ll take that ride.
Maybe you wonder where you are
I don’t care.
Here is where times is on our side
take you there
take you there.
We’re on a road to nowhere –
We’re on a road to nowhere –
We’re on a road to nowhere –
There’s a city in my mind
come along and take that ride
and it’s all right
baby
it’s all right.
And it’s very far away
but it’s growing day by day
and it’s all right
baby
it’s all right.
Would you like to come along
you can help me sing this song
and it’s all right
baby
it’s all right.
They can tell you what to do
but they’ll make a foo lof you
and it’s all right
baby
it’s all right.
There’s a city in my mind
come along and take that ride

We’re on a road to nowhere. We’re on a road to nowhere.
We’re on a road to nowhere. We’re on a road to nowhere.

Jackson Williams.

The Body Language of Poetry (Djelloul Marbrook)

Typewriter

Vox Populi

Don’t gesticulate with your hands or make faces when speaking, the teachers at my British boarding school told me. It’s vulgar. I’m sure that this enjoinder at such an impressionable age imbued my poems with reticence and austerity.

But poetry has a body language. The poet’s way of breathing supplies oxygen to the body and to the poem. The poet’s way of walking and talking is inherent in the poem. I knew a poet who walked like the prow of a ship cutting through waves, the bone in its teeth, as sailors say, and that how her poems walked and talked.

The body language of a poem is also shaped by the script used in its writing. If it was first written by hand the poet’s hand, the stops and starts, the way I’s are dotted and t’s crossed, lives in the poem. If the poem was first typed, the…

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A poem from the future

ideas.ted.com

Editor’s note: This poem kicks off a new “Question Worth Asking” series: “How weird will the future be?” First up: a piece from poet and TED Fellow Ben Burke.

[Dear Helen- So sorry. Didn’t have time to write that poem. But my future self sent me one yesterday. So we’re good. Crazy, right? It’s totally legit and actually from the future, so no need to double-check, you’re probably too busy anyway. Happy New Year!  – Ben Burke]

Edited_RECORDER

THE TRANSHUMANIST’S LAMENT
or
TOO MANY RIVERS, NOT ENOUGH LAKES
or
OH, FUTURE — YOU SO CRAZY

I arrived in the basket that was weaved here before me
And I stayed in any place with a roof that would store me
I have lots of belongings
But didn’t pack for the trip
I got here, they put pants on me
And then the world gave me the slip

I’ve lived as slowly as…

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Why We Need Nomads

Vanessa Runs

Jamming and bumming around on the Homer Spit in Homer, Alaska

I recently stumbled on a Quora question in which the writer was thinking about quitting his job and selling his possessions to travel the world. He gave a brief description of himself (single, in his 20s, a job but no career), and asked whether he should go for it.

The resounding answer was yes, but not necessarily because it was a respectable lifestyle. Rather, because he was young enough to get away with it. Because he still had time to build a career, a family, and a real life. Because now was the time to get the travel bug out of his system.

I was glad to read the encouragement and travel tips he received, but couldn’t help wonder: what if a 40-something man with three young children also wanted to become a nomad?

A nomad is someone who travels extensively, with no real home to speak of other than…

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