Tag Archives: Lifestyle

Why We Need Nomads

Vanessa Runs

Jamming and bumming around on the Homer Spit in Homer, Alaska

I recently stumbled on a Quora question in which the writer was thinking about quitting his job and selling his possessions to travel the world. He gave a brief description of himself (single, in his 20s, a job but no career), and asked whether he should go for it.

The resounding answer was yes, but not necessarily because it was a respectable lifestyle. Rather, because he was young enough to get away with it. Because he still had time to build a career, a family, and a real life. Because now was the time to get the travel bug out of his system.

I was glad to read the encouragement and travel tips he received, but couldn’t help wonder: what if a 40-something man with three young children also wanted to become a nomad?

A nomad is someone who travels extensively, with no real home to speak of other than…

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“Parklife” (blur)

Confidence is a preference for the habitual voyeur
Of what is known as
(Parklife)
And morning soup can be avoided
If you take a route straight through what is known as
(Parklife)

John’s got brewers droop he gets intimidated
By the dirty pigeons, they love a bit of him
(Parklife)
Who’s that gut lord marching?
You should cut down on your porklife mate, get some exercise

All the people
So many people
They all go hand in hand
Hand in hand through their parklife
Know what I mean?

I get up when I want except on Wednesdays
When I get rudely awakened by the dustmen
(Parklife)
I put my trousers on, have a cup of tea
And I think about leaving the house
(Parklife)

I feed the pigeons I sometimes feed the sparrows too
It gives me a sense of enormous well-being
(Parklife)
And then I’m happy for the rest of the day safe in the knowledge
There will always be a bit of my heart devoted to it

All the people
So many people
And they all go hand in hand
Hand in hand through their parklife

Parklife
(Parklife)
Parklife
(Parklife)

It’s got nothing to do with
Vorsprung durch Technik you know
(Parklife)
And it’s not about you joggers
Who go round and round and round
(Parklife)

All the people
So many people
And they all go hand in hand
Hand in hand through their parklife

All the people
So many people
And they all go hand in hand
Hand in hand through their parklife

(JW)

Coming Out as a Scholarship Student at Columbia: Invisible Labor & Class-Lines

Koko Jaeger

milbank-green

Ever since May 1st, I’ve been thinking a lot about labor.

May 1st is, of course, international workers’ rights day: one day of the year. But our economy is driven by blue collar workers every day of the year, not just on the first day of Spring when those who are willing choose to recognize it for 24 hours.

I am lucky enough to attend a really wonderful undergrad college at a really wonderful university and I am hugely grateful for that and for the opportunities it affords me. Full disclosure, though, I am here on an incredible scholarship, without which I would absolutely not be able to afford tuition to this school.

Here at Barnard, and at the greater Columbia University, the grass is always tidy, the paving stones are always swept and, in the Barnard dorms anyway, the bathrooms are cleaner than any dorm bathrooms have a right…

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1181 Durfee Avenue: 1983-1986

Tropics of Meta

Print

Between the fourth and sixth grades, you are seized by three deep and compulsive obsessions:

            Marvel comic books (all things Daredevil and X-Men and Spiderman).

BMX bicycles (yours: a second-hand Mongoose, unwieldy and spray-painted black after you stripped the frame down to its bare chrome-moly tubing).

And video games.

Your parents find all three activities doubtful.  Comic books are allowed since they get you reading something else besides MAD magazine and therefore seem remotely educational.  And when you’re on your bicycle, you’re out of the house, out of your parents’ way, and doing something sort of athletic, even if the extent of this athletic activity is you and your friends racing up and down Parkway Avenue, seeing whose tires can leave the longest skid, and assembling ramps from plywood scraps.  (One day, your friends will shove a few extra bricks under one of these ramps, raising it higher than…

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The Top 10 Tips I’ve Learned from Minimalists

theextraordinarysimplelife

tiny-house-2

I’m not going to covet other minimalists’ lives anymore.

I don’t travel the world with a single backpack.

I haven’t packed up my family to travel across the country in an RV for a year.

I am not a single woman with a futon, a suitcase and a laptop.

I didn’t choose 600 square feet of dwelling space with a hobby farm ‘round back.

YET, I adore reading about these amazing people and their even more intriguing journeys toward transformation. In perusing books and blogposts, these characters seem like old friends. We’re all rooting for them. Their triumphs and courageous leaps of faith provide the inspiration for our own stories. However, through all this story following, I have found there is not one formula for choosing a simple life…it is not a one-size-fits all t-shirt. No matter what our life looks like, I do believe each and every one of these…

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We’re All Living in Portlandia

Midwest Texan

20130215-140957.jpg

Once in a while, a popular word will snowball into a state of such broad explanatory use that thoughtful people must either whittle it down to a more definite size or call for its utter dissolution.  This is the present state of hipster, a term wielded with equal frequency as a fashion, a movement, a demographic, and even an insult.

In 2008, Adbusters ran an article with a title that is, to date, still the only title to successfully convince me to read Adbusters.  It was called “Hipster: The Dead End of Western Civilization.”  This article came at just the right time with just the right dose of acid to make it one of the most important pieces of social journalism of our time.  In it Douglas Haddow defined “hipsterdom” as an ugly and regrettable mutation of Western counterculture.  Its chameleonic quality–wearing the symbols of  countercultural…

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