Tag Archives: Travel

The Scream / Edvard Munch’s Oslo

Pedersen's Last Dream

Agony & Ecstasy

NO PAINTING SUMS UP the alienation and isolation of 21st century existence as does The Scream by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch. After Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, it is the second most recognised painting in the world.

The idea came to Munch while walking in the wooded hills above old Oslo more than a century ago, following a bout of heavy drinking the previous evening.

“I was walking along the road with two friends. The sun set. I felt a great sadness. Suddenly the sky became blood red. I stopped, leaned against the railings, dead tired. And saw the flaming clouds as blood over the blue-black fjord and city. My friends walked on. I stood there trembling with angst. And I sensed a loud, unending scream pierce nature.”

Written shortly after his walk, the words that would eventually lead to the series of paintings and lithographs entitled Skrik (The Scream), contain…

View original post 2,023 more words

Why We Need Nomads

Vanessa Runs

Jamming and bumming around on the Homer Spit in Homer, Alaska

I recently stumbled on a Quora question in which the writer was thinking about quitting his job and selling his possessions to travel the world. He gave a brief description of himself (single, in his 20s, a job but no career), and asked whether he should go for it.

The resounding answer was yes, but not necessarily because it was a respectable lifestyle. Rather, because he was young enough to get away with it. Because he still had time to build a career, a family, and a real life. Because now was the time to get the travel bug out of his system.

I was glad to read the encouragement and travel tips he received, but couldn’t help wonder: what if a 40-something man with three young children also wanted to become a nomad?

A nomad is someone who travels extensively, with no real home to speak of other than…

View original post 3,312 more words

Crane Operator for Shanghai’s Tallest Building Takes Amazing Photos of City Below

TwistedSifter

crane operator wei genshen photos of shanghai from above (1)

Photographer Wei Genshen

 

Amateur photographer Wei Genshen has taken advantage of his day job as a crane operator to take breathtaking photos of the city from high above the sprawling metropolis. Currently under construction is the Shanghai Tower in Lujiazui, Pudong, Shanghai. Upon its projected completion in 2014, the building will stand approximately 632 metres (2,073 ft) high and will have 121 stories, making it the second-tallest building in the world and the tallest structure of any kind in China. [Source]

Led by Chinese architect Jun Xia, Shanghai Tower was designed by American architectural firm Gensler, and takes the form of nine cylindrical buildings stacked atop each other. Shanghai, with a total population near 24 million, is the largest city in China and home to more than 20,000 buildings over 11 storeys.

According to the Daily Mail, the amazing series below recently earned Wei second prize…

View original post 163 more words

Kilimanjaro

Doctor Quack

Last week, I climbed Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest peak in Africa.

I could write about how great of a cultural experience it was, how much fun I had, the beauty of the mountainside, or the joy of camaraderie between strangers that had never met before and might never meet again.  But I won’t.

I won’t, because what struck me most about my experience on Kilimanjaro was not the expected storyline of adventure, camaraderie, and scenic grandeur.  What struck me was the stoic coldness with which the mountain rose above the African plains, and how I internalized that coldness as I marched slowly towards its summit.

I’m writing about clouds and dust.

Kilimanjaro to the sky

It all began when I left my familiar soil – oaks and redwoods, Pacific skies, coffee shops and bike lanes – and I encapsulated myself in a giant metal tube with tiny windows and crying babies.  A day or…

View original post 1,227 more words

ISS Cupola: The Window to the World

startrail2

startrail1

TwistedSifter

 

The Cupola is an ESA-built observatory module of the International Space Station (ISS). Its seven windows are used to conduct experiments, dockings and observations of Earth. It was launched aboard Space Shuttle mission STS-130 on 8 February 2010 and attached to the Tranquility (Node 3) module. The Cupola’s 80 cm (31 in) window is the largest ever used in space.

Its name derives from the Italian word cupola, which means “dome”. It is extremely important to the ISS astronauts, as previously they have been confined to looking out of small portholes or at best the 20-inch (50 cm) window in the US Destiny laboratory.

Specifications
Overall height: 1.5-metre (4.9 ft)
Maximum diameter: 2.95-metre (9.68 ft)
Launch mass: 1,805-kilogram (3,979 lb)
On Orbit mass: 1,880-kilogram (4,145 lb)
Dome: Forged Al 2219-T851
Skirt: Al 2219-T851
Windows: Fused silica and borosilicate glass
MDPS shutters: DuPont Kevlar/3M Nextel sheets
Electrical power:…

View original post 1,124 more words