What if Other Planets Were as Close to Earth as the Moon?

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Originally posted on TwistedSifter:

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What if a celestial body like Jupiter, the biggest planet in our solar system, was as close to the Earth as our moon? Would it fill the night sky? Illustrator and author Ron Miller sought to answer the question using the reference photograph above.

It’s important to note that this is strictly a visual exercise. If a planet like Jupiter were actually as close to Earth as the Moon, its immense gravitation would wreak havoc on our planet. So for the gallery below, please temporarily suspend your disbelief and just imagine how amazing it would be to see a planet like Saturn in such incredible detail.

For reference, the Moon is about 386,243 km (240,000 miles) from Earth and has a diameter of approximately 3,476 km (2,160 miles). The Earth’s diameter is 12,742 km (7,918 miles)

[Ron Miller/Black Cat Studios

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Iggy Azalea, Andrew WK, and the Paradox of Authenticity in Pop Music

Originally posted on Flavorwire:

The question of authenticity in music is one of those debates that surfaces periodically, and it’s raised its scaly head a few times this week. Most notably, it’s manifested in two places: in Perfect Pussy singer Meredith Graves’ Basilica Soundscape talk on Andrew WK and Lana Del Rey, and the differing standards of authenticity to which she claims they’re held; and in the fact that someone at Billboard thought it was a great idea to get Robert Christgau to review Iggy Azalea’s New Classic, a review in which he compares her to the Beatles, suggests that Tupac’s “flow was never world class,” and holds forth on how Azalea’s authenticity, or lack thereof, matters not a jot. So, who’s right? Do we care about authenticity anymore? The answer, I’d argue, isn’t as simple as either Graves or Christgau wants to argue.

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So Bad It’s Good: The Transcendent Peculiarity of ‘The Room’

Originally posted on Flavorwire:

Bad movies are not a simple matter. There are nearly as many categories of terrible movies as there are for great ones: there are films that are insultingly stupid (Batman & Robin), unintentionally funny (Birdemic), unintentionally, painfully unfunny (White Chicks), so bad they’re depressing (Transformers), and so on. But the most rewarding terrible movies are those we know as “so bad they’re good” — entertaining in their sheer incompetence, best braved in numbers, where the ham-fisted dramatics and tin-eared dialogue become fodder for years of random quotes and inside jokes. And in this spirit, Flavorwire brings you the latest installment in our monthly So Bad It’s Good feature: Tommy Wiseau’s legendary The Room, which Entertainment Weekly dubbed “The Citizen Kane of Bad Movies.”

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The Production of Monsters

Originally posted on The Not Me:

george-rodger-empire-state-building-observatory-800x800In 1977, my grandparents took me and my sisters to the top of the Empire State Building. I can remember being annoyed by all the waiting in line just to ride the elevator to the observation floor. We probably spent more time waiting to board that elevator than we spent viewing the view. Still, when our turn came around and after the elevator finally reached the 102nd floor, I burst out of the doors to see what all the fuss was about.

At first, I was too distracted with taking in the view to notice that my grandpa was not with me. When I turned back to search for him, I saw that he had parked himself close to the elevators away from the windows and the view. I called to him, “Grandpa, you gotta come see this.” “No thanks,” he replied “I’m good here.” “Pretty please,” I pleaded. This time he…

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How “Lost” Changed the Way the World Watches TV

Originally posted on Quartz:

Mr. Eko, the Nigerian drug lord turned priest, would say that the story of Lost’s creation was not coincidence, but fate.

Hatched as a half-baked kernel of an idea by an ABC executive on his way out the door, the show became a gargantuan worldwide success just a few months later. The timing was fortuitous. Lost debuted just as social media was entering adulthood, and the show became the quintessential 21st century viewing experience. The “perfect storm of Lost,” as TV critic Alan Sepinwall puts it in his book The Revolution Was Televised, began on September 22, 2004. Ten years later, it really does seem like fate.

When Lost began, Facebook was in its infancy and Twitter was still two years away. But it was clear the current was changing. Lost fans had multiple ways to discuss the show: a barrage of forums and fan sites, its own rabidly detailed wiki Lostpedia

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